St. Mary’s University welcomes you to a free, annual lectures series featuring men and women who have shaped the Catholic Intellectual Tradition – a tradition at the heart of the educational enterprises at St. Mary’s.

Glenn MacTaggart (J.D. ’79, M.A. ’89), longtime attorney and counsel with Prichard Hawkins Young LLP, and his wife, Karla MacTaggart, gave a major gift to St. Mary’s to create the MacTaggart Catholic Intellectual Tradition Lecture Series Endowment. The gift allows for the recruitment of speakers from various faith traditions to speak to the University and San Antonio communities about such topics as Catholicism in a changing world, religion in a pluralistic society, and faith in areas such as art and science. The lecture series will be one of the cornerstones of a Center for Catholic Studies that St. Mary’s is in the process of establishing, which is a result of the University’s Defining Moment Comprehensive Campaign.


Climate Science and People of Faith

featuring Katharine Hayhoe, Ph.D., Climate scientist and Endowed Professor of Public Policy and Law, Texas Tech University

Wednesday, March 3
7 p.m. via Zoom

Join us via Zoom for a lecture on climate change and the importance of understanding and addressing it as a person of faith.

  • Headshot of Katharine Hayhoe, Ph.D., Climate scientist and Professor of Public Policy and Law at Texas Tech University

    Katharine Hayhoe, Ph.D.

    Climate scientist and Endowed Professor of Public Policy and Law, Texas Tech University

    Katharine Hayhoe, Ph.D., is an accomplished atmospheric scientist who studies climate change and why it matters to us here and now.  She is also a remarkable communicator who has received the National Center for Science Education’s Friend of the Planet award, and the American Geophysical Union’s Climate Communication Prize.  She has been named to the Time Magazine 100 Most Influential People list and the United Nations Champion of Earth in Science and Innovation.  She may be best known to many people because of how she is bridging the gap between scientists and Christians — work she does in part because she is a Christian herself.

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