A Catholic and Marianist Liberal Arts Institution

2011-2012: Graduate Catalog

English Literature and Language (M.A.) Download PDF Version

Academic Year

2011-2012

School

Graduate School School Web site

School Dean

Henry Flores, Ph.D. hflores@stmarytx.edu

Department

English

Program Director

Gwen Diaz, Ph.D. gdiaz@stmarytx.edu

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission into St. Mary's University Graduate School, you will need to submit the following (along with application):

  • (2) Letters of Recommendation
  • (2) Official Transcripts reflecting your degree earned.
  • Official GRE/GMAT/MAT
  • Official TOEFL (80 Computer based) (international students only)
  • Financial Guarantee (international students only)

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Generally, admission is granted only to those with high promise for success in graduate study. Potential may be demonstrated by experience in increasingly responsible positions, previous schooling, and test scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) recorded within the past five years. A minimum GPA of 3.0 is acceptable, with special consideration given to course work in English.

The minimum Academic Index required for admission is:

GPA X (Verbal + Analytical GRE) = 2650

Generally, students must provide acceptable test scores at the time of enrollment. If students are otherwise highly qualified, they may take the GRE during their first semester of enrollment, with further enrollment contingent upon test scores.

Degree Requirements

English Literature (36hrs)
English Literature and Language Non-Thesis

Course # Course Title Hours
Required (9hrs):
EN7301Contemporary Literature Criticism3
EN7311Comparative Literature: Modern & Postmodern3
EN7380Research Project3
Required (3hrs):
EN7312Literature of the Renaissance3
EN7321Shakespeare's Major Plays3
Electives (24hrs):
EN7302Myth & Psyche in 20th Century Literature3
EN7303Critical Approaches to the Short Story3
EN7304Satire in English Literature3
EN7305Milton & the Metaphysical Poets3
EN7306Theories of the Psychoanalytical Poets3
EN7307Courtly Love & Social Disclosure3
EN7312Literature of the Renaissance3
EN7313Realism & Naturalism in the American Novel3
EN7314International Literature3
EN7315American Transcendentalism3
EN7316History of the American Novel3
EN7318Nineteenth Century British Literature3
EN7322T.S. Elliot, Emily Dickenson, & Walt Whitman3
EN7323Faulkner & Hemingway3
EN7324D.H. Lawrence & Virginia Woolf3
EN7331Writing Assessment3
EN7332Persuasive Writing3
EN7333Contemporary Rhetorical Theory3
EN7334Approaches to Teaching Writing/Critical Thinking3
EN7341Analysis & Criticism of Television & Film3
EN7342Approaches to Teaching Literature3
EN7343Linguistics: Voice and Test3
EN7344Creating the Virtual Text: Reader Response Theory3
EN7351Fiction: The Creative Process3
EN7352Poetry: The Creative Process3
EN7353Writing for Publication3
EN7361Theory of Comedy (Tragedy) in Various Literary Genre3
EN7362Peace & Violence in Literature3
EN7363Literary Criticism: Voice & Text3
EN7170Directed Readings*1
EN7270Directed Readings*2
EN7370Special Studies in Literature & Language3
EN7396English Internship
*Requires Program Director Approval
Total hours36

English Literature (36hrs)
English Literature and Language Thesis

Course # Course Title Hours
Required (15hrs):
EN7301Contemporary Literature Criticism3
EN7311Comparative Literature: Modern & Postmodern3
EN7312Literature of the Renaissance OR3
EN7321Shakespeare's Major Plays3
EN7690Thesis6
Electives (21hrs):
EN7302Myth & Psyche in 20th Century Literature3
EN7303Critical Approaches to the Short Story3
EN7304Satire in English Literature3
EN7305Milton & the Metaphysical Poets3
EN7306Theories of the Psychoanalytical Poets3
EN7307Courtly Love & Social Disclosure3
EN7312Literature of the Renaissance3
EN7313Realism & Naturalism in the American Novel3
EN7314International Literature3
EN7315American Transcendentalism3
EN7316History of the American Novel3
EN7318Nineteenth Century British Literature3
EN7322T.S. Elliot, Emily Dickenson, & Walt Whitman3
EN7323Faulkner & Hemingway3
EN7324D.H. Lawrence & Virginia Woolf3
EN7331Writing Assessment3
EN7332Persuasive Writing3
EN7333Contemporary Rhetorical Theory3
EN7334Approaches to Teaching Writing/Critical Thinking3
EN7341Analysis & Criticism of Television & Film3
EN7342Approaches to Teaching Literature3
EN7343Linguistics: Voice and Test3
EN7344Creating the Virtual Text: Reader Response Theory3
EN7351Fiction: The Creative Process3
EN7352Poetry: The Creative Process3
EN7353Writing for Publication3
EN7361Theory of Comedy (Tragedy) in Various Literary Genre3
EN7362Peace & Violence in Literature3
EN7363Literary Criticism: Voice & Text3
EN7170Directed Readings*1
EN7270Directed Readings*2
EN7370Special Studies in Literature & Language3
EN7396English Internship
*Requires Program Director Approval
Total hours36

Department Courses and Descriptions

Department Courses and Descriptions
EN 3341G Teaching of Composition (W) (3)
Focuses on rhetoric as both theory and practice, studying the history of rhetorical theory from Aristotle to the present, researching recent composing processes and methods for facilitating and developing student writing in today's culturally diverse classroom. (formerly EN 4380)

EN 3381G Modern Short Story (W) (3)
Cross-cultural reading of the modern short story; historical development of the genre; theory and practice of short story criticism. (formerly EN 4374)

EN 3383G Twentieth Century Novel (W) (3)
A study of novels written throughout the Twentieth Century focusing on genres, themes and stylistic concerns particular to the Twentieth Century novel. Authors likely to be included are Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Lawrence Durell, Zora Neale Hurston, Margaret Atwood, and Joyce Carol Oates. (formerly EN 3327)

EN 3386G Masterpieces of Drama (W) (3)
Study the greatest plays of the western world. Emphasis on the genre, and the dramatization of issues and values in cultural contexts. Aeschulus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Jonson, Moliere, Wycherley, Racine, Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, and modern dramatists. Emphasis on specific genres developed by writers. (formerly EN 3382)

EN 4310G American Romanticism: Origins and Development (W) (3)
A consideration of the origins and development of American Romanticism in literature. The study begins with romantic origins in American Puritanism; considers its flowering during the rise of American Transcendentalism; examines its on-going influence in modern and contemporary American writers. It considers the writings of authors such as: Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson, Whitman, Hawthorne, Cather, Frost, Stevens, Walker Percy. (formerly EN 3371)

EN 4312G American Realism (W) (3)
The course will probe how the novel as genre in the Age of Realism (Civil War to First World War) expresses the class, racial, and gender tensions of the times. Typical authors read include Twain, James, Howells, Wharton, Jewett, Dreiser. (formerly EN 4378)

EN 4321G Southern Experience in Fiction (W) (3)
A consideration of the raise of U.S. Southern fiction, examining the historical, cultural, and philosophical forces which gave rise to this literature through the study of the South's function and criticism. Authors will include: Cable, Chopin, Faulkner, O'Connor, Warren, Welty, Gordon, Petry, Wright, Gaines, Porter. (formerly EN 4362)

EN 4331G American Literature Since 1950 (W) (3)
As America as a nation came to maturity and American writers developed into significant literary figures after the Second World War, so too, this period embraces a new chorus of feminine and minority voices. It coincides with America's reluctant assumption of the role of world power and adds significantly to an understanding of ourselves as a diverse people with a distinct culture within the world community. (formerly EN 4353)

EN 4351G Medieval English Literature (W) (3)
The correlation of cultural meaning and literary excellence in the medieval world view manifested in the English mystery cycles, the Pearl Poet, Chaucer, and the alliterative Morte Arthur. (formerly EN 3352)

EN 4361G Renaissance Literature (W) (3)
Critical study of selected readings in British prose, poetry, and drama from 1500 to 1600. (formerly EN 3353)

EN 4365G Shakespeare Studies I (W) (3)
Taming of the Shrew, Richard II, Henry IV, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night, Julius Caesar, Troilus and Cressida, Othello, Lear, Tempest. (formerly EN 4372)

EN 4366G Shakespeare Studies II (W) (3)
Richard III, Romeo and Juliet, Midsummer Night's Dream, Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, Measure for Measure, Hamlet, Macbeth, Anthony and Cleopatra. (EN 4365 not a prerequisite) (formerly EN 4373)

EN 4371G Eighteenth Century British Literature (W) (3)
A critical study of selected readings in prose and poetry from 1660 to 1780. (formerly EN 3356)

EN 4375G The Beginnings of the British Novel (W) (3)
Correlation of story, narrative voice, and cultural movement from Daniel Defoe to Maria Edgeworth. Interaction between theme and narrative voice with the economic and political events of the 18th Century. Evolution of narrative voice to ideological stance and literary self-consciousness. (formerly EN 3325)

EN 4381G Nineteenth Century British Literature (W) (3)
This course will cover the poetry and prose of the Romantic and Victorian periods. The course will consider the influence of historical, social, political, and philosophical thought on the literature and the effect of ideas developed during this time on contemporary thinking. (formerly EN 3358 or 3360)

EN 4385G Nineteenth Century British Novel (W) (3)
This course studies the different forms of the novel in the Nineteenth Century and the social and cultural reasons for their emergence. Authors whose works may be included are: Emily and Charlotte Bronte, Jane Austin, Charles Dickens, Conan Doyle, and Mary Shelley. (formerly EN 3326)

EN 4390G American; EN 4391G British; EN 5300G International Love in Literature and Life (W) (3)
Romantic love imaged in literature as a means of self-transcendence in and through the life cycle, gender differences, and personal quest.

EN 4392G American; EN 4393G British; EN 5301G International The Self (W) (3)
The Self in Literature Psychological constructs of self as paradigms to examine fictional selves who project an imaginative world that mirrors and structures daily life.

EN 4394G American; EN 4395G British; EN 5302G International Hero and Anti-Hero (W) (3)
From the epic hero to the anti-hero and postmodern hero in literature.

EN 4396G American; EN 4397 British; EN 5303 International Literature (formerly EN 3365) and Modernism (W) (3)
Modernism as a concept; its beginnings as a major aesthetic and philosophical revolt, and its evolution as it is reflected in the literary works.

EN 5320G History of the Novel (W) (3)
This international course will trace the development of the novel as a form, beginning with the earliest versions, the picaresque, such as Cervantes' Don Quixote, moving to courtly narratives, such as Madame de Lafayette's The Princess de Cleves, moving to the social canvasses of 18th Century England, such as Fielding's Tom Jones, then on to the high 19th Century realism of Russia, such as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, then finally to the great modernist novels of the early 20th century, such as Proust's Remembrance of Things Past.

EN 5325G Classic Literature of the Western World (W) (3)
Designed to familiarize the student with the classic works of the Western World from Dante to Moliere, to more recent authors such as Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir. Works selected represent the various literary movements of the Western World. (formerly EN 3342)

EN 5326G Literature of American Minority Groups (W) (3)
A consideration of significant poetry and fiction by authors from three American minority groups; Afro-American, Mexican-American, Native American Indian. It examines the historical, cultural, and philosophical aspects of these groups through a study of their literature and criticism. It includes works by writers such as the following: Langston Hughes, Alice Walker, Ernest Gaines, Rudolfo Anaya, Roberta Fernandez, Leslie Silko, N. Scott Momaday. (formerly EN 3341)

EN 5328G Mexican and other Latin American Literature (W) (3)
20th Century Latin American Literature focusing mainly on Mexican literature from the revolution to the present (Fuentes/Paz). It also incorporates Nobel and award-winning authors of other Latin American cultures (Neruda, Bombal, Valenzuela).

EN 5330G Women Authors (W) (3)
Cross-cultural reading of the works of women authors; study of the development of a woman's tradition in literature, with emphasis on the themes, genre, and writing styles created by 20th Century female authors. (formerly EN 4342)

EN 5333G U.S. Latino Literature (W) (3)
The course explores the contemporary Hispanic-American authors of Mexican-American background particularly, and also of Cuban-American and Puerto Rican-American backgrounds. A variety of literature including novels, short stories, and poetry will be read and analyzed. Through the works, issues of culture, ethnicity, assimilation, and heritage will be discussed. Among authors to read are Sandra Cisneros, Rudolfo Anaya, Rosario Ferre, Oscar Hijuelos, Rolando Hinojosa-Smith, and Ana Castillo.

EN 5335G Catholic Authors (W) (3)
The focus of this course is on the cultural, philosophical, historical, and religious vision of a selection of major catholic authors from early writers such as Dante and Sor Juana Ines. to writers of the present time, such as Shusaku Endo, Flannery O'Connor, Walker Percy.

EN 5340G Literature of Peace and War (W) (3)
A consideration of selected International Literature, from ancient Greece to the present, which expresses the concepts of peace and war, violence and non- violence. Emphasis is given to the philosophical and psychological concepts of conflict resolution - personal, historical, and cultural - as they are expressed in literature. It includes poetry, fiction, and film from ancient Greece, Germany, England, Japan, the United States, and other nations. (formerly EN 4393)

EN 5342G The Romance Throughout History (W) (3)
The lover as created in the dialogue of the subjective and social. From the foundations of the traditional in the Late Greek pastoral tradition and the medieval French and German romances through the English Renaissance to the postmodern romance.

EN 5348G, EN 5349G Topics in International Literature (W) (3)
With International Literature as its focus, this course may develop a cross- cultural theme common to various nations, such as: the world's struggle, marriage and the family, religion and politics, philosophy, and culture. Or the course may concentrate on one nation or region to study its culture, history, philosophy, and religion as portrayed through its literature.

EN 7301 Contemporary Literary Criticism (3)
This course offers a background in current literary criticism including approaches such as: Psychoanalytical, Feminist, Postmodern, and Postcolonial. Students are introduced to key thinkers in each school of criticism. These critical approaches are applied to a selection of contemporary masterpieces, such as, Proust, Poe, Kafka, Fuentes, Hawthorne, and Borges.

EN 7302 Myth and Psyche in 20th Century Literature (3)
This course focuses on myth as a source of knowledge of the human psyche and rests theoretically on the findings of Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and Jacques Lacan, who provide through myth a wealth of knowledge about human values, fears, and obsessions. The works of literature to be analyzed are 20th century classics by writers such as Kafka, Sartre, Garcia-Marquez, and Lessing.

EN 7303 Critical Approaches to the Short Story (3)
The course will be divided between the "classic stories by classic writers" and the contemporary stories that are revitalizing the short story form in America and throughout world literature. The course will benefit writers and teachers, as well as all those who wish to understand how the short story has emerged as a major form of literary expression in our age.

EN 7304 Satire in English Literature (3)
A satisfactory definition of satire is as slippery as an eel. Satire is perhaps the liveliest kind of writing, as old as literature itself. The Greeks developed it, yet it was the Romans who named it. It is still much alive in our time. Theorists agree that the essential elements are wit, humor, and attack. The classical view of satire emphasized its moral intent. The modern view focuses also on its techniques.

EN 7305 Milton and the Metaphysical Poets (3)


EN 7306 Theories of Psychoanalytic Literary Criticism (3)


EN 7307 Courtly Love and Social Discourse (3)
We will trace the origins of Western romantic love (Gawain and the Green Knight, Le Morte d'Arthur, and others). We will contrast how men and women loved in and out of the castles of this Western courtly culture with how they loved in Ovid's Rome (The Art of Love) and in French treatise that explained the rules of courtly love.

EN 7311 Comparative Literature: Modern and Postmodern (3)
By concentrating on the fascinating phenomenon of postmodernism, this course develops a thorough perspective of contemporary literature from modernity to recent days. It also sharpens analytical skills through the study of critical theories that define the Postmodern. Works will range from Kafka and T.S. Eliot to Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, Marguerite Duras, Margaret Atwood, and Thomas Pynchon.

EN 7312 Literature of the Renaissance (3)
This course is designed to provide graduate students with a detailed survey of non-dramatic poetry and prose of the early Tudor and Elizabethan periods. The course will examine selected texts from an historical perspective with special emphasis on the development of literary genres during the sixteenth century. Political, philosophical and social issues of the period will be raised as we consider the debates that shaped the poetics of the early and High Renaissance. Readings include Sir Thomas, Sir Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and many more.

EN 7313 Realism and Naturalism in the American Novel (3)
Based in historical interpretation, this course offers the first literature of the modern, mass society we ourselves live in. The interpretive strategy will consider the complex, self-contradictory nature of a literary construct as it reflects its social context. We will cover eight novels (none very long), among which are Rebecca Harding Davis's Margaret Howth, Elizabeth Stuart Phelp's Doctor Zay, Mark Twain's Huckleberry Finn, Henry James's The Bostonians, and Edith Wharton's The Reef.

EN 7314 International Literature (3)
This course focuses on Latin American novel and short story written during the famous "Doom" period of the 20th century, when many Latin American authors received Nobel Prizes for their innovative masterpieces. The social and stylistic aspects of these works will give the student insight into the cultural diversity of the Americas. Authors studied include Juan Rulfo, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, Gabriel Garcia-Marquez, and others.

EN 7315 American Transcendentalism (3)
This course defines transcendentalism by exploring its origins and development in 19th and 20th Century American history, culture, and literature. The course should provide an in-depth philosophical approach to American literature, as well as an increased ability to read literature critically. We will study works by the following authors: Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson, Hawthorne, Alcot, James, Cather, Frost, Welty, Stevens, and Percy.

EN 7316 History of the American Novel (3)
As a comprehensive overview of the American novel, this course offers on highly representative novel from each literary period with additional attention to minority fiction. Periods and possible authors are as follows: Neo-Classical (Brockden Brown), Low Romantic (Cooper), Romantic (Melville), Realist (James), Naturalist (Wharton), Modernist (Faulkner), and others.

EN 7320 Writers and Their Works (3)
This course focuses in detail on the works of 1 or 2 of the following: Shakespeare (Major Plays); T.S. Elliot, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman; Faulkner and Hemingway; D.H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf; W.B. Yeats, James Joyce, and Virginia Woolf.

EN 7321 Shakespeare's Major Plays (3)
The course follows four Shakespeare plays through the centuries, examining how they were treated--or mistreated--during the Restoration, and during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Film versions of the plays will be compared with Shakespeare's text. The course also traces the main lines of Shakespeare criticisms from Ben Johnson to Benard Spivak.

EN 7322 T.S. Eliot, Emily Dickinson, and Walt Whitman (3)


EN 7323 Faulkner and Hemingway (3)


EN 7324 D.H. Lawrence and Virginia Woolf (3)
In this course we will study the major fiction of two contemporary modernists whose original experiments with technique are responsible for the modern novel and whose versions of reality challenged Victorian constructs of gender and class.

EN 7331 Writing Assessment (3)
This course asks, "What is good writing?" Through holistic grading, portfolio grading, and other types of grading, students learn how to evaluate all types of writing. Both discussion and a final project teach students to derive their own conclusions about good writing through process instead of product. This course also involves multicultural, gender, class, and age issues in writing.

EN 7332 Persuasive Writing (3)


EN 7333 Contemporary Rhetorical Theory (3)


EN 7334 Approaches to Teaching Writing & Critical Thinking (3)


EN 7341 Analysis and Criticism of Television and Film (3)
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the major critical and analytical approaches to the study of television and film and to help students apply these approaches to individual films and television programs. Once learned, these skills can be applied in a classroom setting or used to enhance one's own viewing. After you take this course, television and film will never be the same again.

EN 7342 Approaches to Teaching Literature (3)


EN 7343 Linguistics: Voice and Text (3)


EN 7344 Creating the Virtual Text: Reader Response Theory (3)


EN 7351 Fiction: The Creative Process (3)
This course focuses on writing short fiction. Students also work on related forms such as dramatic nonfiction, narrative essays, profiles, and personal narrative construction in short works by recent authors, in particular, complication and resolution, foreshadowing and pace, audience, and point of view. The chief emphasis of the course, however, will be given to developing the student's own voice and style.

EN 7352 Poetry: The Creative Process (3)
This course combines the study of contemporary poetry and poetics with the writing and workshopping of poetry. The course will examine poetry by major writers since Eliot, Stevens, and Bishop, including work by Denise Levertov, Anne Sexton, Richard Hugo, Sylvia Plath, W.S. Merwin, Nikki Giovanni, Charles Simic, Rita Dove, and others. Students will write and workshop a number of their own poems for the course and will select one contemporary poet to study in some detail for a final essay to be presented to the class.

EN 7353 Writing for Publication (3)
This writing course is designed to train student writers in "writing for publication" and in the methodologies for getting their work published. The student will learn to target writing for a market, to become acquainted with copyright problems, style sheets, manuscript preparation, and the publishing industry.

EN 7361 Theory of Comedy /Tragedy in Various Literary Genres (3)


EN 7362 Peace and Violence in Literature (3)


EN 7363 Literary Criticism: Voice and Text (3)


EN 7370 Special Studies in Literature and Language (3)


EN 7380 Project (3)


EN 7690 Thesis (6)

Department Faculty

English Literature and Language (M.A.) Faculty Website

Department Website

English Literature and Language (M.A.) Website


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