A Catholic and Marianist Liberal Arts Institution

2011-2012: Graduate Catalog

Education (M.A.) Download PDF Version

Academic Year

2011-2012

School

Graduate School School Web site

School Dean

Henry Flores, Ph.D. hflores@stmarytx.edu

Department

Education

Program Director

Daniel Higgins, Ph.D. dhiggins@stmarytx.edu

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission into St. Mary's University Graduate School, you will need to submit the following (along with application):

  • (2) Letters of Recommendation
  • (2) Official Transcripts reflecting your degree earned.
  • Official GRE/GMAT/MAT
  • Official TOEFL (80 Computer based) (international students only)
  • Financial Guarantee (international students only)

Program Specific Admission Requirements

Generally, admission is granted only to those with high promise for success in graduate study. Potential may be demonstrated by experience in increasingly responsible positions, previous schooling, and test scores on the GRE or MAT. Generally, students must provide acceptable test scores at the time of enrollment. If students are otherwise highly qualified, they may take the GRE or MAT during their first semester of enrollment, with further enrollment contingent upon test results.

The minimum Academic Index required is:

200 X GPA + Average GRE [(Verbal + Quantitative)/2]= 1050
OR
10 X GPA + MAT = 68

Additional prerequisites may also be required in preparation for certain graduate course work. This will be determined upon transcript evaluation by the Director of the program. A student may proceed with graduate work while completing undergraduate deficiencies, with permission from the Graduate Program Director.

Degree Requirements

Education (36hrs)
Concentration: Computer Science

Course # Course Title Hours
General Education Required (18hrs):
ED6350Reading in the Classroom3
ED6302Foundations of Educational Practice3
ED6304Human Development and Learning3
ED6306Curriculum Theory & Practice3
ED6311Applied Educational Research3
ED7301Organizational Theory & Administration3
ED7302Private and Public School Law3
ED7307Instructional Supervision & Evaluation3
ED7392Internship in Education3
NOTE: One of the student teaching courses listed below (or both of the teaching internship courses) is required of students seeking initial teacher certification. Students must have completed at least four of the courses listed above (including ED7392) with a grade of "B" or better in each course. A six-hour student-teaching course of both of the teaching internship courses can be substituted for ED7392 and one other course from the list above. Students must take the Professional Development Seminar undergraduate course or a 3-hour graduate course during their student-teaching semester. Interns must take a 3-hour graduate education course during each semester of internship.
ED6639Student Teaching in the Elementary School6
ED6689Student Teaching in the Secondary School6
ED5398Teaching Internship I3
ED5399Teaching Internship II3
Concentration Computer Science (18 Hrs):
CS6310Systems Analysis & Design3
CS6320Files & Databases3
CS6330Advanced Network & Data Communications3
CS6340Advanced Software Engineering3
CS6350Hardware & Operating Systems3
Concentration Computer Science Elective (3 hrs):
Any Graduate level CS course with the exception of CS60003
Total hours36

Education (36hrs)
Concentration: English Literature and Language

Course # Course Title Hours
General Education Required (18hrs):
ED6302Foundations of Educational Practice3
ED6304Human Development and Learning3
ED6306Curriculum Theory & Practice3
ED6311Applied Educational Research3
ED6350Reading in the Classroom3
ED7301Organizational Theory & Administration3
ED7302Private and Public School Law3
ED7307Instructional Supervision & Evaluation3
ED7392Internship in Education3
NOTE: One of the student teaching courses listed below (or both of the teaching internship courses) is required of students seeking initial teacher certification. Students must have completed at least four of the courses listed above (including ED7392) with a grade of "B" or better in each course. A six-hour student-teaching course of both of the teaching internship courses can be substituted for ED7392 and one other course from the list above. Students must take the Professional Development Seminar undergraduate course or a 3-hour graduate course during their student-teaching semester. Interns must take a 3-hour graduate education course during each semester of internship.
ED6639Student Teaching in the Elementary School6
ED6689Student Teaching in the Secondary School6
ED5398Teaching Internship I3
ED5399Teaching Internship II3
Concentration English Literature & Language (18 Hrs):
EN7301*Contemporary Literary Criticism3
EN7302Myth & Psyche in 20th Century Literature3
EN7303*Critical Approaches to the Short Story3
EN7307Courtly Love & Social Disclosure3
EN7311Comparative Literature: Modern & Post Modern3
EN7321*Shakespeare's Major Plays3
EN7313Realism & Naturalism in the American Novel3
EN7315*American Transcendentalism3
EN7316*History of the American Novel3
EN7331*Writing Assessment3
EN7334Approaches to Teaching Writing/Critical Thinking3
*Strongly recommended
Total hours36

Education (36hrs)
Concentration: International Relations

Course # Course Title Hours
Reading Focus Required (18hrs):
ED6350Secondary Content Area Reading3
ED6302Foundations of Educational Practice3
ED6304Human Development and Learning3
ED6306Curriculum Theory & Practice3
ED6311Applied Educational Research3
ED7301Organizational Theory & Administration3
ED7302Private and Public School Law3
ED7307Instructional Supervision & Evaluation3
ED7392Internship in Education3
NOTE: One of the student teaching courses listed below (or both of the teaching internship courses) is required of students seeking initial teacher certification. Students must have completed at least four of the courses listed above (including ED7392) with a grade of "B" or better in each course. A six-hour student-teaching course of both of the teaching internship courses can be substituted for ED7392 and one other course from the list above. Students must take the Professional Development Seminar undergraduate course or a 3-hour graduate course during their student-teaching semester. Interns must take a 3-hour graduate education course during each semester of internship.
ED6639Student Teaching in the Elementary School6
ED6689Student Teaching in the Secondary School6
ED5398Teaching Internship I3
ED5399Teaching Internship II3
International Relations Electives (18 Hrs):
IR7320Asian Security Issues3
IR7340Middle East Security Issues3
IR7350European Security Issues3
IR7380African Security Issues3
IR8325Business in an Interdependent World3
IR8305International Conflict Resolution3
PO6324Inter-American Security Issues3
PO6315US Foreign Policy3
Total hours36

Education (36hrs)
Concentration: Political Science

Course # Course Title Hours
General Education Required (18hrs):
ED6302Foundations of Educational Practice3
ED6304Human Development and Learning3
ED6306Curriculum Theory & Practice3
ED6311Applied Educational Research3
ED6350Reading in the Classroom3
ED7301Organizational Theory & Administration3
ED7302Private and Public School Law3
ED7307Instructional Supervision & Evaluation3
ED7392Internship in Education3
NOTE: One of the student teaching courses listed below (or both of the teaching internship courses) is required of students seeking initial teacher certification. Students must have completed at least four of the courses listed above (including ED7392) with a grade of "B" or better in each course. A six-hour student-teaching course of both of the teaching internship courses can be substituted for ED7392 and one other course from the list above. Students must take the Professional Development Seminar undergraduate course or a 3-hour graduate course during their student-teaching semester. Interns must take a 3-hour graduate education course during each semester of internship.
ED6639Student Teaching in the Elementary School6
ED6689Student Teaching in the Secondary School6
ED5398Teaching Internship I3
ED5399Teaching Internship II3
Political Science Required (6 Hrs):
PO6305American Institutions3
PO6316Great Political Thinkers3
Political Science Required (12 hrs):
PO5303Urban Political Institutions & Processes3
PO6300Political Science Research Methods3
PO6301*Public Administration & Policy3
PO6307*Constitutional Law3
PO6312*International Relations Theory3
PO6315United States Foreign Policy3
PO6324National Security Policy3
PO6352*U.S. Latino Communities3
PO6353Urban Issues3
PO6354Campaign Management3
PO6356Campaign Finance3
PO6358Gender Politics3
PO7300Directed Readings3
*Strongly recommended
Total hours36

Department Courses and Descriptions

Department Courses and Descriptions
ED 6302 Foundations of Educational Practice (3)
Explores presuppositions of educational efforts via analysis of existence and intentionality and inquiries into cognition and epistemology. Relates basic norms of ethical educational practice to the intellectual, moral, and religious conversions of the educator and learner. Locates the ground of professional practice in the self-transcending intentionality of the existential subject. Relates the commonsense, theoretical, transcendent, and methodological realms of meaning to the practice of formal education. Criteria for interpretation of educational ends and means established through investigation of personal belief systems, goal setting, and self-assessment strategies.

ED 6304 Human Development and Learning (3)
Theory and research related to cognitive development and learning and their importance to the sequencing and structuring of curricula. Classroom management theories and techniques. Understanding and use of social justice, collaborative decision making, team building, and coalition building.

ED 6306 Curriculum Theory and Practice (3)
Strategic planning for curriculum development and improvement to promote life-long learning. Theory and research related to the evaluation of the teaching/learning process, the systemic change process and collaborative instructional planning.

ED 6311 Applied Educational Research (2)
Research designs and methods including gathering, analyzing, disaggregating, and interpreting data. Utilize pupil personnel services and programs to meet the needs of all students. Use of data to facilitate informed decisions for school improvement and maximization of student learning.

ED 6350 Secondary Content Area Reading (3)
Introduction to reading instruction in various academic subjects. Study of instructional strategies for vocabulary development, for actively involving students in critical thinking activities through questioning and group discussion, and for developing study skills.

ED 7390 Internship in Educational Leadership (3)
Administrator's internship in a public or "recognized" school. The internship provides the opportunity to develop and enhance leadership skills under the supervision of a person holding a Texas Education Agency Certificate with three years experience at the level of assignment. Planning, development, and implementation of an effective instructional system. Use of research findings, time, staff, advanced technologies, community resources, and financial means to maximize student outcomes. Presentations to boards of program preparation personnel and practitioners. Field-based assessments by field and preparation program personnel. Peer assessment.

CS 6310 Introduction to Systems Analysis and Design (3)
Concepts, methods and techniques used in the analysis and design of information systems. Student projects using the techniques in practice.

CS 6320 File and Database Systems (3)
Development and application of databases with emphasis on topologies, normalization, and queries. Prerequisites: CS 6310 and proficiency in Pascal or Pascal-like language.

CS 6330 On-Line and Communication Based Systems (3)
Introduction to intra- and inter-computer communications concepts and methodology. Issues include topologies, error detection and correction, LAN, ISO models, and protocols. Prerequisite: CS 6310.

CS 6340 Advanced Software Concepts (3)
Modern methods of software design development and implementation. Emphasis is placed on application system generators and very high level programming languages. Prerequisite: CS 6310, proficiency in Pascal or Pascal-like language.

CS 6350 Systems Hardware and Software (3)
Introduction to different types of computer hardware and operating systems software at both the microcomputer and large system level. Students will work with both the DEC VAX and a representative micro computer and their operating systems. Prerequisite: CS 6310.

EN 7301 Contemporary Literary Criticism (3)
This course offers a background in current literary criticism including approaches such as: Psychoanalytical, Feminist, Postmodern, and Postcolonial. Students are introduced to key thinkers in each school of criticism. These critical approaches are applied to a selection of contemporary masterpieces, such as, Proust, Poe, Kafka, Fuentes, Hawthorne, and Borges.

EN 7302 Myth and Psyche in 20th Century Literature (3)
This course focuses on myth as a source of knowledge of the human psyche and rests theoretically on the findings of Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung, and Jacques Lacan, who provide through myth a wealth of knowledge about human values, fears, and obsessions. The works of literature to be analyzed are 20th century classics by writers such as Kafka, Sartre, Garcia-Marquez, and Lessing.

EN 7303 Critical Approaches to the Short Story (3)
The course will be divided between the "classic stories by classic writers" and the contemporary stories that are revitalizing the short story form in America and throughout world literature. The course will benefit writers and teachers, as well as all those who wish to understand how the short story has emerged as a major form of literary expression in our age.

EN 7311 Comparative Literature: Modern and Postmodern (3)
By concentrating on the fascinating phenomenon of postmodernism, this course develops a thorough perspective of contemporary literature from modernity to recent days. It also sharpens analytical skills through the study of critical theories that define the Postmodern. Works will range from Kafka and T.S. Eliot to Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortazar, Marguerite Duras, Margaret Atwood, and Thomas Pynchon.

EN 7312 Literature of the Renaissance (3)
This course is designed to provide graduate students with a detailed survey of non-dramatic poetry and prose of the early Tudor and Elizabethan periods. The course will examine selected texts from an historical perspective with special emphasis on the development of literary genres during the sixteenth century. Political, philosophical and social issues of the period will be raised as we consider the debates that shaped the poetics of the early and High Renaissance. Readings include Sir Thomas, Sir Philip Sidney, Edmund Spenser, and many more.

EN 7313 Realism and Naturalism in the American Novel (3)
Based in historical interpretation, this course offers the first literature of the modern, mass society we ourselves live in. The interpretive strategy will consider the complex, self-contradictory nature of a literary construct as it reflects its social context. We will cover eight novels (none very long), among which are Rebecca Harding Davis’s Margaret Howth, Elizabeth Stuart Phelp’s Doctor Zay, Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn, Henry James’s The Bostonians, and Edith Wharton’s The Reef.

EN 7315 American Transcendentalism (3)
This course defines transcendentalism by exploring its origins and development in 19th and 20th Century American history, culture, and literature. The course should provide an in-depth philosophical approach to American literature, as well as an increased ability to read literature critically. We will study works by the following authors: Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Dickinson, Hawthorne, Alcot, James, Cather, Frost, Welty, Stevens, and Percy.

EN 7316 History of the American Novel (3)
As a comprehensive overview of the American novel, this course offers on highly representative novel from each literary period with additional attention to minority fiction. Periods and possible authors are as follows: Neo-Classical (Brockden Brown), Low Romantic (Cooper), Romantic (Melville), Realist (James), Naturalist (Wharton), Modernist (Faulkner), and others.

EN 7321 Shakespeare’s Major Plays (3)
The course follows four Shakespeare plays through the centuries, examining how they were treated--or mistreated--during the Restoration, and during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Film versions of the plays will be compared with Shakespeare’s text. The course also traces the main lines of Shakespeare criticisms from Ben Johnson to Benard Spivak.

EN 7331 Writing Assessment (3)
This course asks, "What is good writing?" Through holistic grading, portfolio grading, and other types of grading, students learn how to evaluate all types of writing. Both discussion and a final project teach students to derive their own conclusions about good writing through process instead of product. This course also involves multicultural, gender, class, and age issues in writing.

EN 7334 Approaches to Teaching Writing & Critical Thinking (3)


IR 7320 Asian Security Issues (3)
This course examines the politics and economics of current security issues in Asia. Both military and non-military security issues will be discussed. Examples are: collective security organizations, environmental security issues, technological transfers, the arms trade, and immigration/refugee patterns.

IR 7340 Middle East Security Issues (3)
This course examines the politics and economics of current security issues in the Middle East. Both military and non-military security issues will be discussed. Examples are: regional balance of power politics, the role of international agencies, environmental security issues such as water, technological transfers, and immigration/refugee patterns.

IR 7350 European Security Issues (3)
This course examines the politics and economics of current security issues in Europe. Both military and non-military security issues will be discussed. Examples are: the changing role of NATO, a united European defense system, environmental security issues such as water, technological transfers, and immigration/refugee patterns.

IR 7380 African Security Issues (3)
This course examines the politics and economics of current security issues in Africa. Military and non-military security issues will be discussed. Examples are: root causes of regional conflict, the international arms trade, environmental security issues, technological transfers, and immigration/refugee patterns.

IR 8300 Theories on the Causes of War (3)
This course examines the current theories on the root causes of war and violent conflict, both civil and international. Causal actors such as ethnicity, race, religion, territory, water, population migration/refugees, arms race/militarism, personality of leaders, etc. are researched.

IR 8305 International Conflict Resolution Theory (3)
This course examines the latest research on how to resolve civil and international conflict. Emphasis is place on paring the appropriate conflict resolution theory to various categories of conflict.

IR 8325 Business in an Interdependent World (same as BA 8325) (3)
A survey of the effects that differences in the cultural, economic, legal, political, social, and technological environments of countries have on the way business is conducted throughout the world. Also explored are the effects that regional economic and political arrangements, and international institutions are having on firms involved in business activities that cross national borders. The course concludes with an examination of some of the contemporary issues and challenges confronting U.S. business people at home and overseas as a consequence of the growing globalization of economic activities.

PO 6300 Political Science Research Methods (same as PA 6300) (3)
This course is designed to introduce graduate students to the principles of social science research design and the various statistical techniques used to manipulate social science data. Students will be introduced to various research techniques and methods utilized in all facets of the discipline from behavioral research to public policy analysis.

PO 6301 Public Administration and Policy (same as PA 6301) (3)
A survey of the field or public administration and public policy including politics and the policy process, organization theory, management principles, human resources management, fiscal policy, program design and evaluation, and ethics.

PO 6305 American Political Institutions (same as PA 6305) (3)
A study of the interrelationships between the three branches of government, intergovernmental relations and major trends in state governments.

PO 6307 Public and Constitutional Law (3)
The role of the judiciary in the interpretation and application of constitutional and public law. Problems and issues arising from various legal areas as well as judicial behavior.

PO 6312 International Relations Theory (3)
This course will provide students with an understanding of the diversity of approaches to the study of international relations, along with an appreciation of key concepts and frameworks. Another aim is to identify themes and issues that have enduring importance rather than those which are of the moment.

PO 6315 United States Foreign Policy (3)
History of U.S. foreign policy; consistencies and variations. Analysis of the role of vital interests of the United States in the world today.

PO 6316 Great Political Thinkers (3)
An introduction to the schools of thought and methods of analysis that could include normative or empirical theory. An in depth evaluation of the traditions of discourse in political thought to include classical and contemporary political theorists.

PO 6324 National Security Policy (3)
This course will examine the politics and economics of national security issues. Special emphasis will be given to the changing international paradigm (i.e., post Cold War) and the impact on domestic political and economic decision making.

PO 6352 U.S. Latino Communities (3)
Examination of U.S. cities with significant Latino populations, as well as urbanization issues of U.S. - Mexican border.

PO 6353 Urban Issues in the Americas (3)
Comparative examination of phenomenon of organization in Latin America (e.g., Mexico City, Buenos Aires, Sao Paulo, Santiago, etc.).

PO 6354 Campaign Management (3)
This course is designed to give students an overview of the functioning of a political campaign. Topics covered include the creation of a campaign organization, development of a strategic plan, the use of media, fund raising activities, and the organization of field operations. This latter topic includes construction of databases, polling, phone banking and block walling. This is a survey seminar in applied political science.

PO 6356 Campaign Finance: Political and Legal Aspects (3)
Scope includes campaign finance law on the national, state, and local levels; history of growth of money and electoral campaigns; effects of money on American electoral system; research methods in campaign finance sources; campaign finance reform and democratic government.

PO 6358 Gender Politics (3)
This course is designed to provide students an overview of the relationship between gender and politics. Topics include: the role of women in politics, women as candidates, officeholders and voters, gender differences in attitudes and beliefs, and issues that have particular relevance to women, i.e. gender discrimination and equal rights.

PO 7300 Directed Readings (3)

Department Faculty

Education (M.A.) Faculty Website

Department Website

Education (M.A.) Website


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